North West EcoFest – Ulverstone



It will involve businesses and not for profit organisations promoting sustainable ideals, food and life style stalls, presentations and activities that promote and support the aims of the NWEC. All welcome.

CENTs Stall on the day and Swap Area – BYO item to swap (must be in good, clean serviceable condition)

Clothing Swap & Dinner (NW Coast)

SUNDAY 19 FEB

5:30pm to 8pm including dinner @ 6pm

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30 King Edward Street, Penguin

 

Bring a plate/dish to share for our community meal

Rules of Swap = 1 item for 1 ticket to be used to buy 1 item

all garments must be clean/laundered, wearable without holes or mending required

all traders are welcome to bring any other items for trading separately in addition to the clothing swap

2016 Tasmanian Community Achievement Awards

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Congratulations to all the nominees, semi-finalists, finalists and winners of the 2016 Tasmanian Community Achievement Awards! The 2016 Gala Presentation Dinner held on 5th November 2016 celebrated a diversity of achievers and community contributors from all around Tasmania. Well done to all! CENTs celebrates not one but two nominations for Sustainability and Community Group of the Year. We are very grateful to our volunteer Administrator and Local Area Coordinators who are instrumental in keeping the community exchange chugging along in communities all around Tasmania – these awards are for you!

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CENTs @ Sustainable Living Festival

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Bring your friends along to the Sustainable Living Festival where we will show case some of the great things you can trade through CENTs without needing money.
We will have plenty of information and happy to walk you through in real time to demonstrate what is available on the exchange while we also promote the sharing and gift economy with FREE giveaways.
CENTs is helping to build sustainable communities throughout Tasmania.
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Getting to Know You Luncheon – Wynyard Sub Branch

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Let’s share a lunch and conversation while trading our wares. Reciprocity is built on trust and trust is built on relationships. Getting to know others in our community is key to people helping one another. We look forward to getting to know you.
Bring along a plate to share & items to trade. A gifting corner will be set up.
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Building the new economy: activism, enterprise and social change

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One perspective of the New Economy Conference

August 16th and 17th, Sydney from Robin Krabbe

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I very much enjoyed this conference in terms of the enthusiasm for all things related to the ‘New Economy’. There was much talk about the “Sharing Economy”, the Social and Solidarity Economy etc, in short for a new economic paradigm that recognises us not as operating best as competitive isolated individuals, but as cooperative and social.

Other themes although somewhat of an undercurrent was a split between the ‘Community Currency’ camp, and the ‘Cryptocurrency’ camp. The latter are sceptical about the power of small groups, instead preferring to rely on technological solutions (and very passionate about them!). Sadly there is a lack of firstly awareness of community currencies (CC’s), or where there is awareness, misconceptions about the potential power of CC’s. Old perceptions of LETs schemes that have failed, or ones confined to small groups trading tarot card readings for aromatherapy still unfortunately persist.

On to the talks – they were divided into themes of on the first day, care, law and our relationship with the natural world. Notable presentations included Katherine Gibson and Amanda Cahill, both pointing to different economic paradigms that highlight the role of communities in well functioning socioeconomic systems.14022358_329273414129913_2807206244601193959_n

The themes on the second day was work, exchange and money. These were the themes I addressed in my talk, which was based firstly on how our economic systems became maladapted particularly due to the decline in meaningful work, and the decline on social relationships, being two vital basic needs we have for health and wellbeing. Research shows when we have less opportunity to engage in meaningful work and positive social relationships, we tend to compensate by seeking other ways of achieving motivation, such as consumerism, drugs and alcohol, seeking power over others etc. Sustainable Wellbeing refers to rediscovering the internal motivation to engage in behaviours that sustain one’s own health and wellbeing, that of others and the health of the planet. CENTs has great potential to restore the main vehicle we have for positive social relationships; that of fair or equal exchange.

Then Alison Bird, Annette Loudon and Russ Grayson did a great combined talk. They firstly covered the history of LETs/Community Exchange in Australia. One very interesting aspect that was mentioned was that particularly in the case of Blue Mountain LETs, which at one stage was extremely active with lots of members but it then declined. The theory put forward for the decline was that before the advent of the internet, what made LETs successful was that they had lots of market days. These would have been instrumental in people meeting face to face and building trust. One unfortunate aspect of the internet is that it cannot replace face to face relationships.

Another interesting session on the second day was Work and Play –the fact that some of us are lucky enough where the line is blurred between work and play. While it was not explicitly discussed, there was some reference to a Universal Guaranteed Income, which would allow us all to do the work we enjoy doing without having to worry about where the money comes from to pay the bills. My personal opinion however is that we would still need an initiative like Community Exchange to ensure the work that needs to be done is done, and that everyone contributes to the best of their ability to that. All in all it was a very inspirational conference with lots of great discussion about the direction we need in to address inequality, climate change and other deeply complex problems.

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http://www.neweconomy.law.unsw.edu.au/

 

 

CENTs Trading Lunch

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Join us for a Winter Warmer shared Pot Luck Lunch featuring CENTs trading tables to sell your wares. Please bring a plate to share and any items you wish to trade. There will also be a FREE table for sharing/gifting of items surplus to your needs which you do not wish to sell for CENTs currency. All welcome.

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Formidable Vegetable Sound System comes to Penguin

“Formidable Vegetable Sound System are spearheading a new and exciting form of musical activism and becoming one of the most important voices in a global cultural movement that began right herein Australia” – Harry Angus (The Cat Empire)index

 

By busting out live shows based around Permaculture and other ecological principles, Formidable Vegetable Sound System is paving the way for a new kind of musical activism based around simple, fun solutions to some of the toughest challenges of our time and are rapidly becoming a favourite on the Australian and international festival circuit with packed dance floors and workshops alike.

Realising that music is one of the best tools for bringing about cultural change, globetrotting permaculture troubadour and ukulele-strumming frontman of Formidable Vegetable Sound System, Charlie Mgee committed himself to composing a repertoire of swingin’ tunes addressing the principles of permaculture in various musical styles ranging from ‘energy-descent electroswing’ and ‘climate-change dubstep’ to ‘peak-oil polka’ and ‘post-apocalypso’, which make for an eccentrically entertaining and unforgettable dancefloor experience when pumped through the ‘rad-ish beet-box’.